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7 February 2011
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Meet Dr George

Dr George

Scotsman Dr George has worked for over 20 years in the north east. Here he talks about his work, his practice and the sorts of problems and issues he faces regularly in his surgery.

Q1. Tell us a bit about yourself and how you came into medicine.

I was born in Fife and after working for some time in hospitals I went into general practice because I like people and enjoy getting to know families.

 

Q2. Tell us something about your practice.

My practice is in Whitley Bay with its mixed urban/rural population. Heart problems and cancers dominate. There is still a north/south divide in the country with regard to health.

 

Q3. To what extent do lifestyle issues affect health?

Lifestyle has an awful lot to do with ill health. The doctor/patient relationship is two way and not about the doctor giving out potions.

 

Q4. What improvements have you noticed during your time in general practice?

Diabetes used to be a killer and with structured care it is now much more manageable. Patient knowledge is improving all the time.

 

Q5. What would be your top tips for a healthier lifestyle?

It's not rocket science. Diet is very important. Exercise is the key to a good life. See your doctor for a regular check up, especially if you're over 50.

Related Links

BBC Health - heart disease
Find out about coronary heart disease, its causes and treatments, and how to reduce your risk.
BBC Health - cancer
Information on forms of cancer, treatments available and support organisations.
BBC Health - diabetes
Article explaining diabetes, its causes, symptoms, treatments, prevention and support organisations.
Dr George

Health Tips

from Dr George

  • Don't smoke.
  • Take up an exercise you'll enjoy - swimming, jogging, running.
  • Keep your intake of alcohol down - 14 units per week for women, 22 units for men.
  • Get your blood pressure checked every 3-5 years.



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